Machine Learning: Teachable Machine and RunwayML

Workshop


Apr 17th,

8:30am — 11:30am


Location: TBD

About The Workshop

DUE TO COVID-19 THIS WORKSHOP IS BEING ADJUSTED


We are working on an update to this workshop to conduct it remotely. More Soon


Using Google's Teachable Machine and runwayML participants will learn the basics of machine learning potential in creative practice. The workshop is an introduction to training models to recognize images, sounds, and poses to then be used in interactive applications.

Cross Disciplinary Connections

Like many new technologies, machine learning has applications across the creative spectrum from utilitarian to experimental. It can be used to recognize, generate and augment existing creative practices and gives users the ability to tap into vast knowledge bases inside existing neural networks. Until recently, these networks were largely out of reach for all but the most expert coders. Luckily software like Teachable Machine and runwayML are providing opportunities for larger communities of artists and designers to take advantage. These processes have many applications across disciplines. See examples here for further ideas about how these skils might augment your existing practice:

https://runwayml.com/madewith

https://experiments.withgoogle.com/experiments?tag=Teachable+Machine

Takeaways

Participants will train a model to recognize a series of gestures, images and/or sounds that will control an interactive web game.

Resources for Continued Investigation

Contact Professor Jonathan Hanahan

Online tutorials:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvjgXvBlbQiydffZU7m1_aw

Instructors

  • Jonathan Hanahan, Assistant Professor of Design

    Jonathan Hanahan is a designer and educator whose speculative practice explores the cultural and social ramifications of experiences which transcend physical and digital occupations and the role technology plays in shaping, mediating, and disrupting our everyday realities. He develops Thick Interfaces—tools, devices, software, artifacts, websites, videos, etc. which agitate the digital facade and reveal the physical reality and complexity which exist underneath the thin veneer of our devices.

    Hanahan received his BARCH from Virginia Tech and his MFA from The Rhode Island School of Design. In addition to his studio practice, Hanahan is an Assistant Professor in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis.


Sign Up | Waitlist

Those who sign up will ask to confirm their participation in the days before the workshop. If you do not confirm and are not very sure you will participate your spot will be given to someone on the waitlist. For more info, questions, or if the workshop is closed and you really want to participate, contact jhanahan@wustl.edu